Amy Gulick In The Trees

Amy Gulick outdoor nature photographer author Alaska salmon treesNature photographer, author, and presenter Amy Gulick kindly took a recent afternoon for a WOWI interview with Tom and myself.  Having spent time in Alaska studying the ecology and wildlife, she has made sense of the heavy sciencey-stuff and presents it in her books, such-as “Salmon In The Trees”.

Amy was great to meet with, and clearly is one of the most animated guests I can remember in our nearly three years of podcasting.  The passion for her work drove this episode, and was a joy to personally experience. I have no doubt our listeners will be similar thrilled to listen to this WOWI session!

Find out about Amy Gulick and her work everywhere online:

Also find her at AnnenbergPhotoSpace.orgSalmonInTheTrees.orgCrossCut.comTheSalmonWay.orgBiArtMuseum.org, BraidedRiver.orgNanpa.orgGirlsWhoClick.orgSafinaCenter.orgSalmonNation.net, and ExploreGreen.com.

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Amy Gulick With Salmon In The Trees

What do you know about the natural cycle of salmon? What do you know about finding funding for storytelling? Amy Gulick is an islander who has stories to tell about salmon and about how she approached her mix of advocacy, community, and funding.

Amy had won enough awards for her photography and writing that the list would probably be longer than this post. She’s a writer, yes. She’s a photographer, obviously. But she identifies as a storyteller who has been telling stories in words and images since she was a child. Children tell stories. It isn’t until we’re adults that we apply labels like writer or photographer.

Her two main books are Salmon in the Trees and The Salmon Way. Not a surprise, she knows a lot about salmon, but has also witnessed how salmon return to their spawning grounds, but also their carcasses return nutrients to the plants and animals along those streams. She’s also witnessed the impact salmon have on communities, families, people.

Storytelling is an art. Storytelling for advocacy is a finer example of it because there are consequences to the story. Advocates advocate, so the telling of a story can hopefully encourage action directly, or at least awareness that can indirectly lead to action.

Her process may be useful, too, because there are many reasons and many topics for advocacy. Got something you want to advocate for? Listen in, and at hear from someone who can tell stories so well that it makes for an engaging interview.

In the words of co-host Don Scoby, learn how to; “Tell Your Own Damn Stories”.


Writing on Whidbey Island (WOWI) episode 38 – Amy Gulick- storyteller in words and images


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